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An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.

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An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.

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Preface First

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Content

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Recommendation - November 2015, Essex Police

These recommendations relate to an investigation into Essex Police’s response to a reported breach of a restraining order. The suspect was not present when officers attended and the arrest was allocated to another team to progress. No arrest was made and further breaches of the restraining order took place.

An act of parliament that provides the core framework of police powers to combat crime and provide codes of practice for the exercise of these powers.
Leads and manages the development of the police service in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
The body that represents the interests of all police constables, sergeants, and inspectors.
Deals with someone’s inability or failure to perform to a satisfactory level, but without breaching the Standards of Professional Behaviour.
Focuses on putting an issue right and preventing it from happening again by encouraging those involved to reflect on their actions and learn. It is not a disciplinary process or a disciplinary outcome.
Department within a police force that deals with complaints and conduct matters.
Refers to lower-level misconduct or performance-related issues, which are dealt with in a proportionate and constructive manner.
This means doing what is appropriate in the circumstances, taking into account the facts and the context in which the complaint has been raised, within the framework of legislation and guidance.
The average is calculated using the individual results of the forces in that most similar force group.
An investigation carried out by IOPC staff.
Carried out by the police under their own direction and control. The IOPC sets the terms of reference and receives the investigation report when it is complete. Complainants have a right of appeal following a supervised investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
This act sets out how the police complaints system operates.
How a police force is run, for example policing standards or policing policy.
An investigation carried out by the police under the direction and control of the IOPC.
The organisation that is responsible for assessing how to deal with a complaint. For example – whether it can be handled locally or reaches the criteria for referral to the IOPC. The appropriate authority may be the chief officer of the police force or the PCC for the force. If a complaint investigation finds that someone has a case to answer for misconduct, the appropriate authority is responsible for arranging any misconduct proceedings. If you make a complaint, the appropriate authority for your case will contact you.
An intelligence-led agency with law enforcement powers, it is also responsible for reducing the harm that is caused to people and communities by serious organised crime.
Policing bodies include police and crime commissioners, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
Investigations carried out entirely by the police. Complainants have a right of appeal following a local investigation (unless it is an investigation into a direction and control matter).
IOPC guidance to the police service and police authorities on the handling of complaints.
A complaint or recordable conduct matter that doesn’t need to be referred to the IOPC, but where the seriousness or circumstances justifies referral.
Parameters within which an investigation is conducted.
A person is adversely affected if he or she suffers any form of loss or damage, distress or inconvenience, if he or she is put in danger or is otherwise unduly put at risk of being adversely affected.
This is where a manager deals with the way someone has behaved. It can include: showing the police officer or member of staff how their behaviour fell short of expectations set out in the Standards of Professional Behaviour; identifying expectations for future conduct; or addressing any underlying causes of misconduct.
This could be the Police and Crime Commissioner, the Common Council for the City of London, or the Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A flexible process for dealing with complaints that can be adapted to the needs of the complainant. It may involve, for example, providing information and an explanation, an apology, or a meeting between the complainant and the officer involved.
A breach of standards of professional behaviour by police officers or staff so serious it could justify their dismissal.
A matter where no complaint has been received, but where there is an indication that a person serving with the police may have committed a criminal offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
Quarter 1 covers 1 April - 30 June Quarter 2 covers 1 April - 30 September Quarter 3 covers 1 April - 31 December Quarter 4 covers the full financial year (1 April - 31 March).
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Used to house anyone who has been detained.
Complainants have the right to appeal to the IOPC if a police force did not record their complaint or notify the correct police force if it was made originally to the wrong force.
The purpose of an investigation is to establish the facts behind a complaint, conduct matter, or DSI matter and reach conclusions. An investigator looks into matters and produces a report that sets out and analyses the evidence. There are three types of investigations: local, directed and independent.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
A person who makes a complaint about the conduct of someone serving with the police.
The ending of an ongoing investigation into a complaint, conduct matter or DSI matter. An investigation may only be discontinued if it meets one or more of the grounds for discontinuance set out in law.
List of officers and staff who have been dismissed from policing, or would have been if they had not retired or resigned.
The type of behaviour being complained about. A single complaint case can have one or many allegations attached.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
An independent judicial officer, the coroner enquires into deaths reported to him/her.
A breach of the Standards of Professional Behaviour that would justify at least a written warning.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
A record is made of a complaint, giving it formal status as a complaint under the Police Reform Act 2002.
This is a format where information is written in plain English and short sentences.
The IOPC must be notified about specific types of complaint or incidents to be able to decide how they should be dealt with.
No further action may be taken with regard to a complaint if the complainant decides to retract their allegation(s).
Casework involves assessing appeals. Casework staff also have a role in overseeing the police complaints system to help ensure police forces handle complaints in the best possible way.
Disapplication means that a police force may handle a complaint in whatever way it thinks fit, including not dealing with it under complaints legislation. This may only happen in certain circumstances where the complaint fits one or more of the grounds for disapplication set out in law.
Conduct includes acts, omissions, statements and decisions (whether actual, alleged or inferred). For example: language used and the manner or tone of communications.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
You can request a review/appeal if you’re not satisfied with how your complaint has been handled.
Date of recommendation
Tuesday, 17 November, 2015
Date the force response is due
Tuesday, 12 January, 2016
Recommendations

Essex Police should consider a review of resourcing within the force control room (FCR) including:

  • The current number of unallocated incidents.
  • The ability of staff within the FCR to comply with incident timeframes for allocation of resources.
  • The expectations of Essex Police when an incident remains unallocated outside the timeframe for dispatch.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

The resourcing levels in the FCR have been reviewed within the last year by an external agency. It is important to focus on the review of reported incidents and to ensure that they are dealt with adequately. A new process has been introduced to the FCR call takers called THRIVE which empowers staff to consider Threat/Harm/Risk/Investigation/Vulnerability/Engagement as part of a risk assessment process and to aid the decision making thereafter. This allows incidents to be dealt with in the set time parameters for priority calls 1-5, to be signposted to other agencies or to advise the Police will not be attending. Since THRIVE has been introduced, the open incident list has reduced by approximately 50% and work continues to identify new opportunities to tackle demand, risk and vulnerability efficiently and effectively. Unallocated incidents are subject to a number or measures such as booking demand appointments, allocating to a desk based investigation team as well as daily review from the pacesetter morning review and the force morning call review.

Essex Police should consider the need to raise awareness within the domestic abuse specialist team (DAST) of their expectations in relation to cases which have been raised to high risk by the multi-agency risk assessment conference (MARAC). This should include a review of policy B1705 MARAC.

Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

Policy B1705 is currently being rewritten in line with a change in procedures. In future the following process will be adopted:-

  • Referrals submitted to MARAC
  • Third party reports from outside agencies will be received by the MARAC co-ordination team
  • The details of the referrals will be entered onto Athena as a non-crime incident
  • The referral will then be considered at the Joint domestic abuse triage team meeting within 5 working days of receipt.
    At this stage Police will formally become aware of the referrals through participation with the JDATT process. It will be for the multi-agency group (Jdatt) to determine the most appropriate response as part of a safety action plan. Police activity may be necessary in the best interests of the victim. It is vital that an IDVA participates at this stage and Police have access to the circumstances of the disclosure from a third party.
  • The JDATT group must balance the risk of breaking down the safeguarding relationships between the victim and the referring agency against the need for Police activity when considering the severity of the offending and the risk posed by the perpetrator. At this stage, the Police could be tasked with safety planning through the Central referral unit. Decisions should be recorded and rationalised. The Police will need to record allegations of crime – but may not necessarily act on them as above.
  • Essentially third party disclosures should not always preclude Police involvement – however the JDATT/MARAC mechanism allows discretion in the best interests of the victim. We need to ensure that our chairs are aware of their responsibility to take such steps as are necessary to meaningfully improve victim safety.
  • The JDATT will decide whether the case needs to be heard at a full MARAC meeting. High risk referrals sent to the MARAC team from other organisations go to the MARAC admin team who inform the multi-agency Joint Domestic Abuse Triage Team (JDATT) at the earliest opportunity. There are permanent police members embedded in this team which will ensure that safeguarding is considered from a police perspective. All staff within the Central Referral Unit (CRU) has been made aware of the amendments to existing policy. The recent training and significant communication for all staff consolidates the need to consider safeguarding for all victims and not just high risk victims.  

Essex Police should review the training provided in relation to domestic abuse, specifically:

  • The adequacy of the DASH training provided to response officers.
  • Whether the requirements of procedure B1702 domestic abuse investigations are adequately covered in officer training.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

Since September 2015 all Staff are in the process of receiving a mandated three day Course entitled ‘Public Protection Awareness’ delivered by staff from Public Protection Command and the Essex Police College. Every front-line officer and member of staff equivalent is to attend the course. The Public Protection Awareness course delivers training on all strands of vulnerability with a heavy emphasis placed on domestic abuse.

In addition there have been a number of seminars delivered to over a thousand officers (by the end of January 2016) which delivers presentations on the following:-

  • Domestic abuse
  • Serious sexual crime
  • Child sexual exploitation (CSE)
  • Gangs
  • Organised Crime Groups (OCGs)

This links to our Force Control Strategy for 2015/16, as approved by Essex Police, which sets out the policing priorities and focuses on harm in our communities. Policy B 1702 is in the process of being rewritten by Head of Public Command in addition to the above training delivered.

Essex police should consider the need for officers who are expected to ‘act up’ as sergeants to receive training (whether formal or informal) for this role.

Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

Essex Police since September have a published Policy entitled ‘Acting and Temporary Promotions’ Police L0125 refers. Compliance is mandatory. A structured process is in place to support the application of Acting and Temporary ranks within the force. The process is used to authorise, approve, claim and monitor the deployment of acting and temporary ranks via line management/ command teams, HR and RMU. A register of Officers authorised to undertake acting duties is held to ensure that where overall operational need prevails, only those suitably skilled officers are used to undertake acting duties. Any formal training will be Command Teams discretion. Many of the officers who are authorised to act up will be attending the public protection awareness course and the vulnerability seminars.

Essex Police should consider whether current practice within the local policing team has the potential to cause investigative delay including:

  • The process of crime file allocation, especially prior to a team taking scheduled rest days.
  • The use of the threat/harm/risk process and whether this is fit for purpose.
  • The use of arrest trays and the process of allocating an arrest.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

Any Domestic abuse calls into Essex Police whether by 999 or 101 system will be diverted in to the Force control room. All incidents will be assessed in relation to threat harm and risk and this will help to inform the initial police response. All incidents of domestic abuse will be attended and a full DASH risk assessment completed by attending officers. There is now a domestic abuse intelligence team who ensure officers are provided with details of previous incidents to help inform the risk assessment.

Policy B1701 Domestic Abuse Initial Grading and Attendance, published 16th December 2015 refers and sets the priorities when dealing with the reports of a DA matter/incident.

All DA matters are also subject of daily Pacesetter scrutiny at local and force daily morning calls.

There is a weekly call between the Det Supt for Public Protection to monitor the number of outstanding suspects for domestic abuse and the number of on-going investigations.

The majority of domestic abuse investigations are dealt with by the Operation Juno specialist domestic abuse investigations teams. These investigations are subject of regular reviews.

Every morning specialist teams such as Pace Setter or Op Juno (Domestic Abuse Investigation Team) scan a Bi query from Athena which outlines suspects outstanding for DV matters from the last 24 hours. The team review these and confirm if they have been arrested - it not and the Risk assessment is high then they are automatically added to the pacesetter tracker. Some medium risks are also added if previous DA incidents were high risk or he/ she is a high risk perpetrator.

At the Pacesetter meetings (0900 and 1500hrs) the chair then tasks the arrests of these suspects (unless a representative gives a reason why not i.e. other department has responsibility already).

Progress against tasks is then measured at every subsequent meeting and each LPA presentative has to report on what thet have done to try and locate the suspect.

With regard to medium and standard risk - these are not managed by pacesetter - these are managed by the OIC. In these cases once the officer has secured the initial information and a statement then it is his/ her duty to circulate the suspect as wanted before they go off duty. Any last known addresses would be subject to arrest requests and where required, including out of force arrest requests.

Given the volume of incidents most disctricts run a "Pace Setter car" - these are essentially officers allocated to deal with outstanding DA incidents where it has been deemed that the risk is such that they can de dealt with by appointment. The pacesetter teams arrange these appointments and also ask a number or questions around safeguarding - any concerns/ changes around the risk then is passed to a supervisor for re-assessment and again subsequently by the Domestic Abuse Safeguarding Teams.

Top priority arrests are nominated for the day for each LPA and are added to the briefing sheet and plans examined to deploy arrest attempts (Usually a HRDA suspect due to Threat harm and risk).

Continuous victim liaison by Op Juno domestic abuse invetsigation teams re safeguarding and suspect whereabouts.

Op Juno liaison with Op Shield for arrest car delopyments on HRDA suspects (Last 2 months has seen approx 50 x HRDA arrests by Op Shield).

Outstanding suspects - A spread sheet of outstanding DA suspects is produced and the Sergeant routinely reviews all of the investigations in conjunction with the DI to determine which investigations require administration and closing, which have investigative gaps and others where further intelligence work can identify more arrest opportunities for the suspect. All three risk gradings are included in the list and Op Juno are contacting victims in the first 48hrs after the event in order to glean as much information about the suspect as possible in order to expedite the arrest of DA suspects.

Given the volume of incidents the LPA runs a Pacesetter car these are essentially officers allocated to deal with outstanding DA incidents where it has been deemed that the risk is such that they can be dealt with by appointment. The pacesetter teams arrange these appointments and also ask a number of questions around safeguarding - any concerns/ changes around the risk then gets passed to a supervisor for re-assessment if required.

Essex Police should consider whether their internal systems could produce alerts to remind officers of the additional updates required in cases of domestic abuse with a suspect outstanding.

Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

The on-going and current review of Policy B1702 will seek to address this learning outcome.

There is daily and weekly data available which documents domestic abuse cases where the suspect is outstanding. These cases are monitored through a weekly call between the Det Supt Public Protection and the local policing commands and subject of regular reviews by Det Sgts and Det Inspectors from the specialist DA units.

All DA matters are also subject of daily Pacesetter scrutiny at Gold Command team level. This links with the National Recommendations made by the HMIC ‘Everyone’s Business’.

Essex Police should consider a review of working relationships between the various teams dealing with victims of domestic abuse including:

  • Whether there is sufficient awareness between teams of their roles and how these interact.
  • Whether there is sufficient communication between teams.
Do you accept the recommendation?: 

Yes

Accepted action: 

The dedicated Juno DA teams work now more closely with the centralised CRU (formerly referred to as DAST).

There is currently a force wide public protection project in place and a decision has been taken that the role of the domestic abuse safeguarding teams will co locate with the Juno teams to bring the safeguarding and  investigation functions together within geographical locations. The time scale for the transition is likely to be six months.

All Juno teams now have access to an IDVA for High Risk DA matters/ incidents (Independent Domestic Violence Advisor) – which enables pro-active implementation of safety plans, which include actions from MARAC.

Whilst the majority of medium and high risk cases are dealt with by the Juno teams who are now supported by the Criminal Investigation Department (CID), it is recognised that all staff require a strong understanding in this area and additional measures have been put in place to assist front line staff which include:

  • Public protection awareness course being delivered to all frontline staff and domestic abuse is included within the syllabus.
  • Personal issue of vulnerability guide including chapter of domestic abuse.
  • Six professional continual professional development days delivered across the county linked to domestic abuse.
  • New Investigative form PP60 is now a mandatory requirement on domestic abuse investigations.
  • Series of communications including vulnerability conferences, INFORM gateway updates and local vulnerability briefings reminding officers of reponsibilities linked to domestic abuse and safeguarding.
  • Domestic Abuse Investigation Team (DAIT) to endorse DA incidents highlighting which police system the information is from to inform the level of risk.
  • Weekly review of outstanding domestic abuse suspects by Detective Superintendent.

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